Immersive, scenario-based elearning.

Developed as an antidote to traditional, static courses covering different individual induction subjects, our Clinical Induction module drops a user into the shoes of a new junior doctor, tackling their first day treating a range of patients in the Emergency Department. Providing a series of challenges, from standard treatment protocols to dealing with major incidents and fire alarms, various subjects are intertwined to fully engage the learner into thinking about how these critical issues relate to their everyday roles.

Before edit After edit

Use the slider above to see the green screen video transformation.

Intelligent course design.

To produce the Clinical Induction module, our in-house creative media team filmed a range of high quality scenario videos, utilising professional actors and make-up companies, which are extensively used throughout the courses. Ranging from a patient with a head injury, who has learning difficulties, to a stabbing victim deteriorating, the scenarios are realistic, immersive and thought provoking, allowing a junior doctor to learn at their own pace in a risk-free environment. The course also features an innovative questioning mechanism which displays to the user a variety of treatment options from which they must select the best course of treatment throughout each stage of the scenario. The course can even respond to a user’s answers, allowing them to make mistakes and intelligently altering the content to show them the consequences of their decisions.

Placeholder
Collage image
Collage image
Collage image
Collage image

Promoting inter-trust co-operation.

In order to reduce the time spent on induction, various Local Education and Training Boards (LETBs), including Yorkshire and Humber, Thames Valley and Health Education South West, have adopted a passport style approach to induction. This means that a junior doctor rotating between trusts in the region can carry their induction training record with them, whereas previously an induction providing clinical information would be required at each trust. We worked extensively with LETBs and individual trusts to ensure that the clinical information recorded was relevant for all trusts in the region, whilst developing mechanisms for trust specific information to be included such as local policies and procedures.

Placeholder
Collage image
Collage image
Collage image
Collage image

Constant monitoring. Continuous improvement.

To ensure that the Clinical Induction is as effective as it can be, many regions run extensive analysis and evaluations of users’ experiences. These have been used to further develop and refine the course to make it as useful and relevant as possible for junior doctors in different areas. This has led to the addition and removal of various pieces of information as well as the creation of entire new scenarios and alteration of the structure of the course to meet these differing requirements.

In Royal United Hospitals Bath, these findings have shown that, after adopting the Clinical Induction module, 90 minutes of a junior doctor’s time has been freed on their critical first day in the trust and that they have saved 24 hours of face-to-face mandatory training per trainee. That is equivalent to over 600 work days or £51,000, annually.

User icon

“Excellent elearning in comparison to my previous trust. The cases are engaging, relevant and well scripted.” – Junior Doctor, NHS Health Education South West, 2015

“Really useful learning tool. Covered an extremely wide range of topics but all very very useful for foundation doctors. A fantastic recap just before starting my job.” – Junior Doctor, NHS Health Education Thames Valley, 2015

“The best elearning module I have completed to date.” – Junior Doctor, NHS Health Education Thames Valley, 2014

“As a company, they have listened and worked with us to improve the experience for all.”

Dr Lindsay Donaldson, Consultant and Deputy Director of Medical Education, Glasgow Royal Infirmary

Perhaps we could help you? Contact us.